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raulrene:

"Elizabeth Marie Tall Chief was considered America’s first major prima ballerina, and was the first Native American to hold the rank."

(via sorayachemaly)

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walkingthenarrowway:

bakongo:

Violence Against Native Women is Not Traditional:  Whisper at Ted x ABQWomen

NOT OK. THIS IS NOT OK. NO. NOT OK.

(Source: babyghosts, via agirlcalledchris)

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nitanahkohe:

neeta-inari:

softlyknowme:

mortuus-lamia:

Native American Mothers.

Who are these women? What are their names? What year were these pictures taken? What nations were they from? What’s the context of these pictures?

Might as well do the research… From top to bottom, left to right:

  1. "Title: Inuit woman nursing two babies, Alaska. Date: [ca. 1903-1908]. Photographer/Illustrator: Lomen Brothers, Nome, Alaska / Dobbs, B.B. (Flickr: Glenbow Museum)

  2. Eskimo mother with child on back”, Library of Congress/Lomen Bros. (DailyMail)
  3. Edward S. Curtis, “Mother and son” - no further info provided by Art.com, which sells this image as a poster.
  4. The photograph was taken in 1905, in Oregon.” Much info very cite!
  5. "A Native American mother and her baby happily hanging on her back from a papoose. Photograph by E.O. Hoppe. Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, 1936" according to this Pinterest user. Not very trustworthy but the best I culd without diving into actual archives.
  6. Photographers: William Pennington and Lisle Updike between 1915 and 1920, Durango, Colorado. Subject not identified. (source)

This doesn’t answer the question of identity, much less what became of these women and their children. It seems that nobody has deemed it important to store that information along with these photos, not even legit museums and archival institutions.

thanks for doing the research! here’s some educated guessing on some of those details:

  • #3 looks like a cradleboard from the Great Basin—maybe Shoshone or Paiute? They have that woven part on top.
  • #4 -looks- Umatilla or Cayuse to me, and since Pendleton blankets didn’t go national until after they changed ownership in 1909, it would make sense that someone with a Pendleton blanket before that date would be living near Pendleton (the Umatilla rez is right next to Pendleton; I suppose the blanket could have been traded somewhere far away, but the mill didn’t even open until 1896 so you’re looking at a prototype Pendleton that was traded locally, before Pendleton became a household name)
  • since #5 was taken in Glacier National Park (which is relatively close to the Blackfeet reservation), I’m guessing they’re Blackfeet?
  • #6 is probably Ute or Navajo because Cheyenne & Arapaho cradleboards don’t look like that, and Durango is in SW Colorado anyways.

(via africabumbada)

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bingwi:

If white people wanna be Native so damn bad than I have a thought: white people reservations. We can round them all up and put them on a rez in the middle of no where with no real access to ,resources or employment, start a federal bureaucracy to see to their affairs, then severely underfund it. Then, to top it all off, we’ll break up the white family and send their children to live with red saviors. Ya know, to civilize them. Then keep them under such system for at LEAST 200 years.

(via thirzac)

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sisterwolf:

Inuit, Greenland - 1903

Rockers.

sisterwolf:

Inuit, Greenland - 1903

Rockers.

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thoughtsofafallenpharaoh:

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

This is why I don’t like the term Native American or even like Indigenous People. It cancels the numerous different groups of people that lived here

thoughtsofafallenpharaoh:

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

This is why I don’t like the term Native American or even like Indigenous People. It cancels the numerous different groups of people that lived here

(via heavymuffintop)

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"Our nation was born in genocide when it embraced the doctrine that the original America, the Indian, was an inferior race. Even before there were large numbers of Negroes on our shoes, the scar of racial hatred had already disfigured our society. From the 16th century forward, blood flowed in battles of racial supremacy. We are perhaps the only nation that tried, as a matter of national policy, to wipe out its Indigenous population. Moreover, we elevated that tragic experience into a noble crusade. Indeed, even today we have not permitted ourselves to reject or feel remorse for this shameful episode. Our literature, our films, our drama, our folklore all exalt it."

— Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (via ethiopienne)

(Source: ethiopienne, via agirlcalledchris)

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Inuit using homemade trampolines to celebrate the end of whaling season. Alaska, 1965.
This is done as a celebration, but also to gain some height to see where the soon-to-be hunted whales are located on the open water.

Inuit using homemade trampolines to celebrate the end of whaling season. Alaska, 1965.

This is done as a celebration, but also to gain some height to see where the soon-to-be hunted whales are located on the open water.

(via crocket)

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"We go into First Nations communities to talk to youth about gangs. When asked, the kids estimate that about 95% of Aboriginal youth is involved in gangs. The actual number is 3%."

Susan Swan, an Ojibway from the Lake Manitoba First Nation

The impact of stereotyping young people

(via urbannativemag)

This is so depressing.

(via unrational)

(via unrational)

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lumbr:

IdleNoMore Vancouver by rabble.ca on Flickr.