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thededucer:

disclosable:

"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.
Gary Lane

WOAH

thededucer:

disclosable:

"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.

Gary Lane

WOAH

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(Source: ngoccjoker, via wizardtales)

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comic-chick:

wombattea:

sizvideos:

How to catch an emu - Video

LET ME TELL YOU A THING

THIS IS A LEGIT THING

THIS IS LITERALLY WHAT PEOPLE DO TO GET EMUS TO COME CLOSE

Apparently you lie on the ground on your back and move your arms and legs.

And the emus are very curious and come over like, “The fuck is that.”

And that’s literally what it is. They come over wondering what the fuck you’re doing

This might be my favorite piece of information I have ever learned.

(via astreetcarnamedstella)

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oakapples:

This afternoon I went to a talk about structural colour in Hibiscus, during which I remembered about these Lamproderma slime moulds that also display this phenomenon (although with a different physical basis). Many species are restricted to the snow-line in montane Europe. Beautiful things.

(via queerlyhypersensitive)

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odditiesoflife:

This 3200 Year Old Tree is So Massive, It’s Never Been Captured in a Single Image…Until Now

It takes a special kind of tree to have a nickname like “The President”. The giant sequoia stands 247 feet tall and is an estimated 3,200 years old. The trunk measures 27 feet across and, between the base and the highest peak, there are an estimated two billion needles.

Until now, the tree had never been photographed in its entirety. A team of photographers from National Geographic worked with scientists from California’s Sequoia National Park to try to be the first.

It took an intricate set of pulleys and levers to scale the tree, which one scientist argues is the largest in the world (if you take into account width). After stitching together 126 separate photos, we are left with this mind-blowing portrait of “The President” captured in a single photo for the first time.

(Source: distractify.com, via odditiesoflife)

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cultrual:

What looks like moss covering rocks is actually a very dense, flowering shrub that happens to be a relative of parsley, living in the extremely high elevations of the Atacama Desert in Chile. (Source)

cultrual:

What looks like moss covering rocks is actually a very dense, flowering shrub that happens to be a relative of parsley, living in the extremely high elevations of the Atacama Desert in Chile. (Source)

(via thededucer)

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nevver:

Into the woods, Catherine Nelson